Pens. Staples. Multi-colored post-it notes. Mini-sized notebooks. File folders. Binder clips. Tape recorders. Computers. Business cards.

    I just can't get enough.

    My obsession with office supplies started when I was about five years old and began playing school with my two older brothers (actually, it was more like me begging them to do their fake homework I assigned them, while they refused and instead ran around the room with their Ninja Turtles and G.I. Joe action figures).

    These episodes of "school" usually ended with me alone in my room pretending to teach my bed full of stuffed animals as I said, "Come on Rainbow Brite, pay attention" and "Barbie and Ken, that is not the way to learn your vocab words!"


Pens. Staples. Multi-colored post-it notes. Mini-sized notebooks. File folders. Binder clips. Tape recorders. Computers. Business cards.
    I just can't get enough.
    My obsession with office supplies started when I was about five years old and began playing school with my two older brothers (actually, it was more like me begging them to do their fake homework I assigned them, while they refused and instead ran around the room with their Ninja Turtles and G.I. Joe action figures).
    These episodes of "school" usually ended with me alone in my room pretending to teach my bed full of stuffed animals as I said, "Come on Rainbow Brite, pay attention" and "Barbie and Ken, that is not the way to learn your vocab words!"
    Yet, through it all I had my school supplies to placate me and enhance my imaginary school room. I grew up hoping to go to college to become a teacher and have a classroom full of real students —and office supplies.
    Each school year, I would get excited to pick out gel pens and highlighters, notecards and clipboards and numerous binders and folders (most of which I didn't use or really need). Still, I would hoard them and continue to buy more.
     By the time I was in college I was a minimalist when it came to school supplies; a couple pens and a notebook was all I needed.
    I loved to read and write and I wanted to teach high school, so majoring in English Education was an easy choice for me. Along the way I decided to add print journalism to my schedule.
    Even though I wasn't a kleptomaniac anymore, my office supply obsession was still lurking under the surface. Was I wanting to teach simply to have a desk full of supplies?
    The answer was no, but I began expanding my career choices.
    Then during my last two years of college, I discovered a newsroom. While writing and copy editing for the school newspaper, I found my nitch. I was home.     
    First and foremost, the paper gave me an outlet for my need to write. I was also able to interact with my amazing co-workers and new people I met on a daily basis. My job as a reporter also satisfied my desire to serve and inform the public.
    But now I faced a new dilemma. I wanted to pursue a career in journalism, but still felt an overwhelming pull to teach and be involved with education.
    After being torn between the two professions for about a year, I finally found my calling —education reporter at the Globe. It provided me the best of both worlds by combining my love of writing, education, working with people and, you guessed it, office supplies. It was the perfect fit.
    And though I may teach sometime in the future, I am no longer conflicted about my job. Newspapers will always be a part of my life because I love what I do.
    I love communicating events, problems and possible solutions to people. I love talking to individuals and discovering that everyone in fact does have an interesting story to tell. I love attending school events and hearing what kids and teenagers have to say about life. I love the warm welcome I've received so far from the people of Dodge City.
    This is why I write; this is why I'm a reporter. It turns out the chance to raid an office supply cabinet is only a perk.