Three men are hiking along U.S. Highway 400 this fall, using their experiences to share God's love and strength with others.

    Matthew Priddle, Noah Myer and Mike Warriner call themselves the "HopeWalk Guys," and they are carrying a message of hope in troubled times.

    "We spread the hope of Jesus across the country and inspire other people to find the Lord and find the hope that comes from meeting Jesus personally," Warriner, a native of Dillard, Ga., said in a phone interview Thursday.

    Priddle is from Wilmington, N.C., and Myer is from Waynesville, N.C. The two men are former clients of the Crossroads Christian Rehabilitation Center in Otto, N.C., where Warriner is the director.


Three men are hiking along U.S. Highway 400 this fall, using their experiences to share God's love and strength with others.
    Matthew Priddle, Noah Myer and Mike Warriner call themselves the "HopeWalk Guys," and they are carrying a message of hope in troubled times.
    "We spread the hope of Jesus across the country and inspire other people to find the Lord and find the hope that comes from meeting Jesus personally," Warriner, a native of Dillard, Ga., said in a phone interview Thursday.
    Priddle is from Wilmington, N.C., and Myer is from Waynesville, N.C. The two men are former clients of the Crossroads Christian Rehabilitation Center in Otto, N.C., where Warriner is the director.
    Warriner said that Priddle and Myer had lost nearly everything to drugs, and their time at the rehabilitation center had taught them that only God can really set them free.
    "They want to go out and share that hope with other people," he said.
    The three men started their journey Aug. 4 in Franklin, N.C., and have covered more than 860 miles so far en route to their final destination of Seaside, Ore.
    The men are currently traveling through Kansas and expect to arrive in Dodge City on Oct. 10.
    Priddle and Myer are traveling on foot, while Warriner follows them in a van stocked with extra clothing, food, water and camping supplies. They travel about 20 miles every day except on Sundays, which are reserved for relaxing and visiting local churches.
    The men camp out at night unless someone invites them in or puts them up in a motel room, and they cook on a campstove and shower when they can.
    Along the way, the men are sharing their story of God's love with the people they meet, Warriner said. He added that they received warm welcomes from everyone they encountered.
    "We're very vulnerable out here on the road," he said. "People can go by and throw Bibles at us or whatever, but nobody has done anything except be kind and friendly and helpful."
    He said the men are finding that their faith grows stronger as they share their stories with other people.
    "We've seen people saved, people healed, people inspired, people encouraged," he said. "There's just all kinds of blessings like that."
    Earlier this week, the men spent a couple of nights in the southeast Kansas town of Oswego and met with Steve McBrien, pastor of the Oswego Assembly of God.
    McBrien said he was inspired by the men and their mission of hope.
    "It was a great experience to see somebody actually living out their belief and stretching themselves beyond what we call normal," he said. "I think it's great."

Reach Eric Swanson at (620) 408-9917 or e-mail him at eric.swanson@dodgeglobe.com.