The purpose of a true teacher seems to be lost in this day and age.

    Where it once meant a person whose duty was to act as an educator and a part-time disciplinarian of our children, it has now morphed into a baby-sitter, so afraid to admonish a child that many have little control over their students.

    Ed Jackson was different. He was a disciplinarian, yet he managed to do so without ever seeming heavy-handed.


The purpose of a true teacher seems to be lost in this day and age.
    Where it once meant a person whose duty was to act as an educator and a part-time disciplinarian of our children, it has now morphed into a baby-sitter, so afraid to admonish a child that many have little control over their students.
    Ed Jackson was different. He was a disciplinarian, yet he managed to do so without ever seeming heavy-handed.
    Jackson died June 8, 2008, in Wichita.
    For 27 years, he was the in-school suspension teacher at Dodge City Middle School, offering guidance to thousands of kids who struggled with their education. After he died, friends and relatives described him as a “true disciplinarian, but also a friend of the students.”
    The school district is now poised to recognize this much-loved teacher with a scholarship in his name.
    Middle school staffer Sarah Schaeffer told the Daily Globe on Monday that she felt Jackson would have been pleased to have the fund, which will provide scholarships for eighth-grade students.
    The fund will be used to honor one or more eighth-graders who have shown a positive attitude toward school and their peers.
    Kudos to Dodge City Public Schools for taking the time to recognize someone so universally held to be one of the gems of our school district. The outpouring of support, from both colleagues and family, shows that Jackson was able to lead a life that truly touched people.
    Students who have a GPA of 2.5 or higher, work at inspiring others and are caught doing good things in and out of the classroom would receive between $400 to $500 at the Cardinal Jam Assembly  in the spring. The money would go to continuing the recipients' education after high school.
    This fund is an excellent way for Jackson's legacy to continue having a positive effect on students' lives, even after he has passed away. With any luck, it will inspire talented — if at-risk — students to take the time and effort to improve their community.
    “Ed never knew a stranger, he never knew a kid he didn't like, he never met a kid he didn't believe in,” Schaeffer said. “He could see the good in absolutely everybody.”
    And now, thanks to this fund, he won't have to stop.