We all have heard about extravagant dishes people eat around the world. Some are aware of what they are eating, but some are not as lucky, finding out too late what they just ate. Let's start the list with crunchy fried scorpions, crickets, large roaches (for which the adjective "juicy" is forbidden), large worms and ants. I have seen some gourmets on TV munching them in delight.


 We all have heard about extravagant dishes people eat around the world. Some aware of what they are eating, some not as lucky, finding out too late what they just ate. Let's start the list with crunchy fried scorpions, crickets, large roaches (for which the adjective juicy is forbidden), large worms and ants. I have seen some gourmets on tv munching them in delight.
        On a menu, still awesome, we find frogs, snakes, turtles and lizards. I bet in prehistoric times, they had roasted dinosaur for a HUGE family dinner.
        When my father was a lad, he was riding a horse and was caught in a bad storm in a field. He rode to the only house around, and the family was so gracious as to invite him for lunch. After eating, my father told them how much he enjoyed the fish they served and asked how they kept it fresh, since the coast was too many miles away, (Refrigeration wasn't everywhere.) Then, he was  surprised when they said "Fish? That was sliced fried snake."
        Later when I was 18, my parents and a group of our relatives went to a nightclub to dine, see a show and dance. For some reason I still don't understand, they dimmed the lights while serving dinner. Convinced that I had chicken on my plate, I ate it. When the lights were back on, I saw what looked to me like a long-legged ballerina dressed in green. It was a frog. (I know, I know, but I don't like frogs, alive, dead or baked.)
        Once we went out to the country to attend a lunch to honor a mayoral candidate. The house was a shack, with not enough serving dishes and large bowls. Yucca, a typical Cuban vegetable, was served in an enameled wash basin. Really! Not being enough, it had a twisted rag in a hole about the size of a quarter to prevent the sauce from spreading on the table. I should have taken a photo of it, but diplomacy prevented me from doing so.
        There are also delicacies — depending on who is planning, cooking, or eating — like deer, venison, rabbit, buffalo and lamb, referring to meats; duck, quail, pheasant and goose if they fly; and an extra seat for the ostrich, which is a not a flying bird.
        From the sea, besides pearls, corals and urchins — not edible, of course — we find swordfish, squid and snail, which has no relationship with the ocean, but it moved so slowly it was late for its own classification.
        All these are found in fine eateries, but they are rare, expensive and delicious.
        Anyway, today you don't need to go to a "haute cuisine" restaurant to pay high prices. Just go to the grocery store, and you won't believe the prices of the democratic hamburger, chicken and plain good old fish. It makes you realize your paycheck is not going to medications only.
        If prices keep going into space like rockets, we will be looking for strange creatures to fix lunch, a snack and dinner. Insecticides will be soon out of order because we'll probably like better crickets, roaches and ants with regular or original flavor, not tasting funny. (They will look funny anyway.) But hard times demand a change in our taste, a spirit of sacrifice and the strenght to adapt to a renewed diet. Prices are pressing on priorities.
        Times are calling for our cooperation, including an implant of new taste buds.