Find your snow boots and clean off the driveway, because the Dodge City High School spring drama takes the stage Saturday at 7:30 p.m.

    Tonight’s performance has been postponed to 7:30 p.m. Monday due to anticipated inclement weather.


Find your snow boots and clean off the driveway, because the Dodge City High School spring drama takes the stage Saturday at 7:30 p.m.
    Tonight’s performance has been postponed to 7:30 p.m. Monday due to anticipated inclement weather.
    Described as "zany" and "madcap" by the publishers, "Pools Paradise" takes place at the vicarage of the Rev. Lionel Toop outside of London. The vicar's wife, Penelope, and their maid, Ida, dabble in the football pools and as the play opens, they think they've won a fortune.
    In typical British farce style, the details of the plot aren't as important as the confusion they cause.
    The play's author, Philip King, wrote "Pools Paradise" 15 years after the success of his earlier comedy, "See How They Run," which the drama department produced last fall.
    "Most of the characters appear in both shows, but the two scripts are not related by plot — this is not a sequel," said director Anne Kaiser.
    The juxtaposition of the two productions in the same year gives most of the student actors an opportunity to play a character they became familiar with in the fall production. Although no one is playing the same role they played before, nearly all of the current cast was involved in the earlier production.
    "This has been an interesting opportunity to play a character we watched a friend play before, and having watched them create the character gives a little insight," said Daniel Weller, who's playing the Bishop of Lax.
    When "See How They Run" premiered in London's West End theater district in 1945, German doodlebug bombs were still dropping and the lead actor complained that they invariably fell at the most inopportune moments, drowning out his funniest lines. The author, more concerned with the audience's reaction, recalled that "no one left the theater until the play was over."
    The morning after the premiere, King rushed out to buy every morning paper to take to his usual cafe and read the reviews over a pint mug of tea and a Spam sandwich. Thankful for the uniformly positive notices, he still couldn't help thinking of Noel Coward, who reportedly sat in bed dressed in a luxurious dressing gown to read his reviews from a silver tray.
    "We've done a big variety of plays in the last four years, from murder mysteries to romantic comedies, and this British farce is my favorite," said senior Andy Denton, who's playing the Rev. Toop complete with kilt.
    Kaiser said she laments the loss of the seniors involved in this production but enjoys this final opportunity to work with them.
    "This is certainly one of the top groups I've ever had, and they'll be missed," she said. "But they have taken a lot of initiative in training the underclassmen and helping to keep the drama program going after they're gone.”
    Kaiser, who is completing her 35th year of teaching this spring, said the rehearsal schedule was short, but the students rose to the task.
    "Almost everyone in this show was also involved in 'Les Miz,' which was a huge effort, but they volunteered to do extra work during spring break and they are ready for an audience," she said.
    Denton said: "We've had a lot of fun putting this together, and the cast has gotten closer in the process. It's a great way to end our years of music and drama at the high school, and we hope everyone will come enjoy the play."

Reach Don Steele at (620) 408-9910 or e-mail him at don.steele@dodgeglobe.com.