Ford County Attorney Terry Malone doesn't want his prosecutors toting firearms into the courthouse along with their briefcases and legal pads.

  And even though state law now allows the practice, Malone will stick to his policy barring prose­cutors from carrying con­cealed guns into the court­house or the Ford County Government Center.


 

Ford County Attorney Terry Malone doesn't want his prosecutors toting firearms into the courthouse along with their briefcases and legal pads.
  And even though state law now allows the practice, Malone will stick to his policy barring prose­cutors from carrying con­cealed guns into the court­house or the Ford County Government Center.
  'I don't think guns solve any problems, and having more of them around isn't going to make me or any­one else or my staff or assistants any safer — or anybody else,' he told the Globe earlier this month.
  Under a new state law, Kansas prosecutors may carry concealed guns inside county courthouses as long as they have a permit and undergo firearms training.
  They must also obtain per­mission from a county attorney, district attorney, attorney general or U.S.
  attorney.
  Prosecutors who carry concealed weapons are exempt from being charged with criminal discharge of a firearm.
  The law applies to coun­ty, state and federal prose­cutors, although the chief judge in a judicial district can ban guns in the court­houses. County commis­sions may opt out of the bill's provisions, which took effect July 1.
  The measure follows a 2006 law authorizing quali­fied Kansans to carry con­cealed weapons as long as they undergo training and obtain a permit. The earlier law banned concealed guns in courthouses — without granting an excep­tion for prosecutors — and in several other locations, including churches and schools.
  Malone said he is not a fan of either the original concealed-carry law or the new measure.
  'I just think it's unneces­sary,' he said. 'We have plenty of protection and security in and around the courthouse and the offices.' Seward County Attorney Don Scott said Friday that he doesn't oppose the new law, but he won't be authorizing his prosecutors to carry concealed weapons into the court­house.
  'We don't have any secu­rity in our courthouse, but I don't think prosecutors carrying pistols around will make us any safer,' he said. Finney County Attorney John Wheeler did not return a call seeking com­ment Friday.
 EDITOR'S NOTE: The Associated Press contributed to this report.
  Reach Eric Swanson at (620) 408­ 9917 or e-mail him at eric.swanson@dodgeglobe.com.