One of Sunday's Quack Attack winners was so excited by his Hard Luck Duck prize, that when he received $100 in cash, he almost ripped the bill in half.

    Jim Geis was in a hurry to make good on his promise to share half of anything he won with the Alley teenager who had sold him his duck. After Geis leaped up from his seat in the crowd and ran to the stage to collect the money, he spied the girl, who was standing nearby with some other Alley kids.


One of Sunday's Quack Attack winners was so excited by his Hard Luck Duck prize, that when he received $100 in cash, he almost ripped the bill in half.
    Jim Geis was in a hurry to make good on his promise to share half of anything he won with the Alley teenager who had sold him his duck. After Geis leaped up from his seat in the crowd and ran to the stage to collect the money, he spied the girl, who was standing nearby with some other Alley kids.
    "No Jim, no!" the crowd yelled as Geis held the $100 bill aloft and began tearing it in half."Don't rip it! Don't do it, Jim! The bank won't take half"
    Geis beamed at the crowd and stopped ripping the bill. He and the young woman exchanged mutual congratulations, and, presumably, a less exuberant plan to divide the prize money.

The few, the loyal, the retailers
     A few hardy merchants represented downtown Dodge during Saturday's citywide sidewalk sale. They were few and far between, but these small businesses were a welcome sight for people who remember when the city's downtown was the center of  community life.
    One of the downtown retail faithful was Dianna Blundell, who spent most of the morning and early afternoon manning the sidewalk table in front of the Christian Book House on 2nd Ave, near the corner of Spruce. In addition to piles of books,     Blundell was selling a variety of tapes, knicknacks, and other small items.
She also had a big pot of coffee on hand, which was going for 30 cents a cup.
    "We've participated in the Dodge Days sidewalk sale since the mid-eighties," she said."Traffic varies. We had quite a lot of people stop by this morning, but things are pretty slow right now. As the sun gets hotter and begins to encroach on us, we'll move everything inside."
    Blundell seemed to know everyone who passed the store - and everyone seemed to know her. Strollers stopped to chat, and people driving by slowed to call out greetings to her.
    "It's a good feeling to be part of a community," she said. "No, I'll never get rich working here, but I get benefits that are more important to me than money."