A commission in Kansas plans to narrow the options it will consider for a plan to address the long-term financial health of the state pension system for teachers and government workers.


A commission in Kansas plans to narrow the options it will consider for a plan to address the long-term financial health of the state pension system for teachers and government workers.

The discussions Wednesday of a 13-member pensions study commission come with Gov. Sam Brownback still advocating that Kansas move toward a 401(k)-style plan for new workers.

The Kansas Public Employee Retirement System projects a gap of nearly $8.3 billion between anticipated revenues and the benefits it's committed to paying through 2033.

Legislators took some steps earlier this year to help close that gap, including increasing the state's contributions to the pension system. The current system guarantees a worker's benefits based on salary and years of services, rather than having the system's investment earnings determine them.