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Dodge City Daily Globe - Dodge City, KS
  • Dodge City teacher renews national certification

  • One Dodge City educator is making strides through a rare accomplishment.

    Dodge City High School's Melody Head has renewed her certification as a National Board Certified Teacher (NBCT) through the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards (NBPTS).
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  • One Dodge City educator is making strides through a rare accomplishment. Dodge City High School's Melody Head has renewed her certification as a National Board Certified Teacher (NBCT) through the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards (NBPTS). Last year, 14 other teachers decided whether they would pursue recertification through the program. Head, a business teacher at the high school, obtained her original certification in 2004 and underwent a difficult year-long process to be selected by the NBPTS. Currently she is the only NBCT working at USD 443. Head heard the news that her certificate in early adolescence and young adulthood/ career and technical education was renewed in late October. “This process of board certification is similar to how a doctor becomes certified in a special area,” Dr. Roger Caswell, who assisted the teachers in their renewal process, said in a news release. “This is voluntary - no state, school district or program is demanding them to go through this process. That's why - a decade after earning their certification the first time - it's a huge commitment to say, 'Yes, I want to do it again.'” Head said that few choose to become certified because of the difficulty of the program as well as its cost. “It is a process that is not for everyone,” she said. Many think the certification process involves a teacher passing a test or being nominated. “National Board certification is a different kind of honor,” Alvin Peters, director of the program, said in a news release. “Teachers must submit extensive documentation of their instruction, including videos of students at work in the classroom.” One benefit of certification programs like the one carried out by the NBPTS is that they remove bias from the type of recognition that takes place at a local level. “I think they're a very strong measure of teachers' abilities in that they're unbiased,” Head said. A recent study by the National Research Council found that students taught by board certified teachers demonstrated greater achievement growth than those taught by other teachers. Overall, Head said that the investment in the program was worthwhile. “It was documentation for all the hard work that I put in,” she said. There are a total of 368 national board certified teachers in Kansas. Nationwide the number is over 102,000.
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