|
|
|
Dodge City Daily Globe - Dodge City, KS
  • Dual credit classes experience growth

  • Lisa Saucedo has been taking a certified nurse's aid (CNA) class at Dodge City Community College (DCCC). But there is something different about Saucedo that sets her apart from many of the others in the classroom: she is in fact a Dodge City High School (DCHS) student.Each year, dozens of DCHS students enroll in so-ca...
    • email print
      Comment
  • Lisa Saucedo has been taking a certified nurse's aid (CNA) class at Dodge City Community College (DCCC). But there is something different about Saucedo that sets her apart from many of the others in the classroom: she is in fact a Dodge City High School (DCHS) student. Each year, dozens of DCHS students enroll in so-called “dual credit” classes with DCCC. Taught at the college, these classes offer DCHS students an opportunity to earn college credit, and see what academic life in college is really like. The program allows junior and senior level students at the high school to enroll in DCCC classes for dual credit, provided they meet the requirements based upon DCCC criteria. Through the program, students earn credit at both DCHS and DCCC. “This semester we have approximately 30 students participating,” DCHS Principal Jacque Feist said. According to Feist, the most popular classes are those that transfer to other colleges or help students achieve certification for a job. The program has been in place for at least the past 25 years. Feist said the program has experienced growth, as some programs have seen more participation than in previous years. Student response to the program varies from year to year and between students. Saucedo, who is a 12th-grader at the high school, said the program was a rewarding experience. “It was a very fun class, learned quite a bit,” she said. Saucedo plans to attend DCCC for nursing. “I wanted to go ahead and take some classes to experience what college was really like,” she added. Feist said that DCHS is in the process of looking to expand the program. Although no specific details were given, Feist said that she expects for the program to see a continual increase in enrollment. In the mean time, the dual credit program remains a valuable option for enrolled students. “It allows some students to start completing their college credits while they are still in high school: that can either lead to an associate's degree or credits that they can transfer to another college or university,” Feist said. “For some students, they have the opportunity to complete a plan of study while they are in high school that will lead to employment opportunities immediately upon graduation from high school.”

        calendar