During its April board of trustees meeting, the Dodge City Community College board of trustees approved an expansion plan for the nursing program that will lease the former Learning Center facility on Frontview Street for its RN program.

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During its April board of trustees meeting, the Dodge City Community College board of trustees approved an expansion plan for the nursing program that will lease the former Learning Center facility on Frontview Street for its RN program.


"The nursing program needs to grow and it can't grow in the current space," DCCC president Dr. Harold Nolte said. "We are now going to have a space big enough for them for when they do their check offs so this gives them an opportunity to grow out.


"It is a nice space and has office space as well."


According to DCCC staff, the infrastructure of The Learning Center from Dodge City USD 443 in place already leaves very little extra needed to be operational.


The lease of the facility agreed upon would be for five years with an option for another five years after that.


"The plan would be to use the space starting in the fall," DCCC vice president for workforce development Clayton Tatro said. "We will still use the current nursing program location and the new facility would be Registered Nurses and Associate Degree in Nursing programs."


The Learning Center facility was vacated by Dodge City USD 443 and was moved to the new administration building on 1st Avenue.


The approval for the lease of The Learning Center was approved with a 7-0 vote.


The cost of the lease would be $6,460 a month for the five-year lease.


The board also approved two new courses that will begin in the fall of 2020. Those programs would be Electrical Technology and Climate Energy Control Technologies.


According to Tatro, the Electrical Tech program would be certificate only with 30 credit hours for the one year program.


Some of the classes would feature National Electrical Code I, Commercial Wiring I, Residential Wiring I and International Residential Code.


For the Climate Energy program, the course would be 44 credit hours for a certificate or an additional 16 credit hours for an associate's degree.


Some of the classes would be heating system fundamentals, environmental HVAC systems, electrical fundamentals, advanced heating systems and sheet metal fabrication.


The approval of the new courses by the board is the first step as the courses will go through the Kansas Board of Regents, Higher Learning Commission and Department of Education for financial aid.


Dodge City Community College confirmed its potential use of Coleman Webb Hall for the housing of first responders and those needing isolated after being in contact with someone with COVID-19 and those confirmed with the virus themselves.


"The request came through the state to have two sites," DCCC vice-president of student affairs & risk management Bev Temaat said. "We are working in partnership with Ford County officials, Department of Homeland Security and other entities.


"We are going to be a backup site. Coleman Webb will be used first then Shelden Hall if need be."


The DCCC locations will be used as a backup to sites that are off campus. Once those sites fill up, DCCC will then be used.


Currently no one has been housed at the locations. Temaat said that meetings take place each morning with officials as plans move forward.


"The housing is voluntary," Temaat said. "Officials are offering it and expect to get a response. Seward County and Garden City have began it and are starting to have some response. I believe we will see some people starting to choose to do that."


To contact the writer email vmarshall@dodgeglobe.com